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Monthly Archives: November 2012

Something You Can’t Find

MEET THE FILMMAKER: Zachary Wyman.

Zachary Wyman is an instantly likable people and a fine filmmaker to boot. So of course The Emerging Filmmaker Project (EFP) wants to show his work. This Thursday night, November 15th, Zachary is screening a short trailer for Something You Can’t Find, a 70 minute feature length film that has been called, “ An existential portrait of a generation. A film experiment on purpose and meaning in life.”

The full movie plays Sunday night, November 18th, at 8:00 p.m. down at The Bug Theatre. EFP host Patrick Sheridan had a chance to chat with Zachary.

P.S.: I really enjoyed your movie and I’m really happy that it is going to screen Sunday night at The Bug. So, Why did you become a filmmaker?
Z.W.: Because I want to create artistic things, and film is the one art form that’s made the most sense to me.  I started seriously pursuing filmmaking in High School, and the more I’ve gotten to know about it the more I feel like it’s what I’m meant to do, in some capacity.

P.S.: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
Z.W.: You will be seeing the trailer for my feature film Something You Can’t Find, which will be screening in full at the Bug three days later!

P.S.: What else are you working on?
Z.W.: I have a new dramatic feature script written, and just recently made contact with a new friend who has expressed interest in collaborating as producer and possible co-writer.

P.S.: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
Z.W.: As a friend recently told me, “You’re a film student.  We’re all weird kids.”  One weird thing about the film is that this morning I realized I may have based one of my character’s poses off of a Rooney Mara Girl with the Dragon Tattoo behind-the-scenes photo.  Subconscious influences…

P.S.: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
Z.W.: Please take a look at the Facebook page I have set up for the film: http://www.facebook.com/SomethingYouCantFind  And feel free to send a message!

P.S.: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
Z.W.: I have been to only one EFP event so far, and only wish I had been told to go before!  I think it’s an incredible networking opportunity, and the event I attended reminded me of a big friendly fan club!  It’s good to meet people with similar interests, and even better when the atmosphere can be so fun.

P.S.: We hope you become a regular and please keep making movies.

Frank Herbert’s Cease Fire

MEET THE FILMMAKER: Jacob Collins.

Jacob Collins recently finished film school at the Colorado Film School. Although he now lives, the New York area, he’s flying back for a special screening of his short movie, Cease Fire, based on the Frank Herbert short story.  Cease Fire plays Thursday night, November 15th at The Emerging Filmmakers Project at Denver’s historic Bug Theatre. EFP host Patrick Sheridan chatted with Jacob over the internet.

P.S.: Why did you become a filmmaker?
J.C.: I wanted to do something with my life that would have me working with different situations, places, people, and stories, all of the time, and up until I went to college, I hadn’t been doing that.

P.S.: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?
J.C.: At EFP, we’ll see the first full-length screening of Cease Fire (it had screened elsewhere once before, but not as a finished film); the plan is to submit it to as many festivals as possible.

P.S.: What else are you working on?
J.C.: Right now, I’m working on a few scripts for both feature and short films, and looking for work. I currently live in the New Jersey/New York City metro area, and with the recent hurricane/storm, things are still pretty chaotic in our area.

P.S.: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?
J.S.: I don’t know if it’s weird or not, but I always try make a finished story out of anything I do, and I try as hard as I can to stick to the original plan first and foremost. I do, however, listen to the ideas of the people that I’m working with on set – if I hear a great idea from someone, and it fits, and can be done with the equipment and time that we have, I’ll go for it. I also have been pretty lucky in getting locations and sponsors for whatever I try to do – most of it is just asking, and being persistent. It took, literally, over a year to find a jet for a single scene with no lines, and we were shot down consistently, and told to look for other options, but in the end, we found what we were looking for, and it was just one of those things that had to be the way it was. Luckily for us, persistence paid off.

P.S.: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?
J.C.: They can check my facebook page, but for right now, since the only short film I’ve directed and released is Cease Fire, people can check out the details on it at www.frankherbertsceasefire.com.

P.S.: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?
J.C.: I’ve never been to the EFP, but I’m glad to hear that new filmmakers have a place to exhibit their work and talk to other filmmakers!

P.S.: Thanks, Jacob.  We look forward to seeing Cease Fire Thursday night!

 

An Evenly Matched Game

MEET THE FILMMAKER: Jay Shaffer

Jay Shaffer is one of those guys that has been working in the film and video industry for a long time, but only recently decided to start making his own work. He’s screening An Evenly Matched Game at The Emerging Filmmakers Project (EFP) on Nov. 15th down at Denver’s historic Bug Theatre. EFP host Patrick Sheridan recently  had a chance to catch up with Jay.

P.S.: Why did you become a filmmaker?

J.S.:  I’ve been involved in the video industry for over 25 years and although I had done some creative  projects early in my career, three years ago I set myself the goal of making at least one narrative short film every year. Last year’s film was called Love and Robots which screened at the EFP in October of 2012.  This year’s film, An Evenly Matched Game, is a little more ambitious. We are thrilled to premier it at the EFP.

P.S.: What are we going to see at the EFP? Has it screened elsewhere and what are your plans for it?

J.S.: I am hoping that you see an emotionally engaging, action sci-fi film. I love the nurturing and engaged audience that the EFP draws, so that gives me realistic feedback on the film. This will be the first time this film has been seen outside of a cast and crew screening. We would love for it to show at the Boulder IFF and Festivus. And after the festival circuit is over, we hope to gather an online audience.

P.S.: What else are you working on?

J.S.: I’m looking for scripts for next summer’s short film. I’d love to find a nice easy-to-shoot western script. I’m also working on a kind of abstract timelapse movie, sort of like “Koyaanisqatsi” called “Kalideoscapes.”

P.S.: Tell us one weird thing about you and/or your movies?

J.S.: I’m more of a cinematographer than a director, so I’m always looking for that killer shot in a film that makes people go, “How did you get that?” I guess it’s not all that weird, but just making your own films is a kind of weirdness IMHO.

P.S.: Where can people go to find out more about you and your work?

J.S.: My Vimeo Page http://vimeo.com/jayshaffer is where I post the good, the bad, and the ugly videos I create. And my Website /blog is at http://jayshaffervideo.com

P.S.: Is there anything you’d like to say about The Emerging Filmmakers Project?

J.S.: I teach some filmmaking courses at Front Range Community College, and it was one of my students that suggested meeting Patrick and possibly showing my film at the EFP. My history with the Bug theater goes back to when it was first renovated by Reed Weimer and George Monchuck in 1994. I helped with setting up the lighting and sound system, in fact, I operated the sound board for the Bug’s grand opening.  I love that the Bug and EFP is a place where filmmakers and fans of indie film can gather and network. And the free beer isn’t bad either.

P.S. Thanks, Jay. See you Thursday night!